7. Playing a Card Game: Fish


Task Details

Task Details

Name of Oral Assessment Task Playing a card game – fish
EAL Student Stage Range  A1, A2, BL, B1, B2, SL, S1, S2
Text Orientation Persuasive
Task Type Interaction and negotiation


Task Specification

Task Specification

Purpose To assess learner’s ability to play a simple card game with another student, negotiating turns etc in English, and to explain how to play a card game.
Description Students in pairs play a card game Go Fish, after learning the basics of the game in a group.  The teacher supervises and observes the game. The students then teach the teacher how to play the game.
Assumed Knowledge and Description
  1. Content knowledge: Familiarity with the game ‘Go Fish’
  2. Text type, genre: Procedure
  3. Linguistic structures and features:

    • Use of common polite phrases and turn taking language, it’s my turn, your turn, thank you, please give me, you ask me, I ask you, Can I have a xx please?
    • Use of instructional language: First you…, Then you…, No not like that, Put it down, Now take another card, Say ‘go fish’
  4. Vocabulary: Numbers to 10, Jack, Queen, King, Joker, Ace


Learning/Teaching Context

Learning/Teaching Context

Language Centre/Mainstream Class EAL Support
Subject/key syllabus objectives, outcomes   English
Topic/Teaching Unit  Leisure
Assessment Conditions
  1. Pair activity
  2. Formal/informal: Informal.  Spontaneous speech.
  3. Time limit: One game
  4. Teacher intervention:  Limited to response to student request for clarification and encouragement
  5. Access to resources:
  6. Scaffolding (modelled/guided/independent support): Modelled/guided
  7. Accommodations:
    1. The students should be of a similar stage of English language proficiency.
    2. Students should not be paired with speakers of the same first language
Notes
  • Pre-assessment activities can be extended or reduced as appropriate for the learners


Task Implementation

Task Implementation

STAGE ACTION STEPS
Pre-assessment activity
  • The rules to the game can vary.  The objective of the basic game is to collect pairs.
  • In a group, students watch as two other students learn the card game ‘Go Fish’ from teacher instructions.  The rules are explained as the students play.  The names of the picture cards are on a chart for students to refer to.  The teacher encourages students to use polite formulas when asking for the cards, please, thank you, your turn etc.
    1. 7 cards are dealt to each player from a 54-card pack (including the jokers).  The remainder of the pack is placed face down between the students.
    2. Any pairs of cards the students have been dealt are placed face up in from of them.  The player with most pairs plays first.
    3. Students take turns to ask for a card matching one they have in their hand.  The other student must hand over the card if he/she has it.
    4. If Student 1 is successful in getting a card from Student 2, they can ask again for another card.
    5. If Student 2 does not have the matching card, they say ‘Go Fish’ or ‘Fish’, and Student 1 takes a card from the pack.
    6. Student 2 then has a chance to ask Student 1 for a card to make a pair.
    7. All pairs must be put down as soon as they are obtained.  A player who runs out of cards draws a new card from the undealt stock.
    8. Play continues until both students have run out of cards.
    9. Players score a point for each pair they have made, 2 points if all four cards of the same denomination have been collected and 5 points for a pair of jokers.
    10. NOTE: If students already know the game, introducing a new rule, such as the object being to collect all four cards of a denomination, or starting with 5 cards, will introduce elements which will help to elicit more of the language of negotiation and discussion of the rules.
Assessment activity
  • In pairs the students play the game
  • The teacher watches one pair, supervising where necessary, and encouraging students to use appropriate language.
  • Once the game is over, the teacher also plays the game, pretending not to know the rules. The students instruct him/her how to play as the game proceeds. The teacher should deliberately make errors in playing so that students have to correct him / her.
  • Click to view the task sheet for this assessment: 
Post-assessment activity
  • Older students can write up a procedure for playing the game, or write the rules of the game on a chart, e.g.  Each player gets 7 cards.  Put all the pairs in front of you.  Ask each other for a card.
  • Students can teach each other the game.

 


Assessment Criteria

TEAL Oral Task 7- Unmarked criteria sheet [PDF]

TEAL Oral Task 7-Unmarked criteria sheet [Word]

 An explanation of the purpose, nature and use of criteria sheets is available at 4. Using the assessment criteria.


Annotations and Commentary

Purpose and value of task

This task assesses students’ abilities to instruct the teacher to play a simple card game, Go fish.

Student’s need to logically present the rules, and explain how the game is played. They need to use task specific nouns and verbs as well as basic procedural and persuasive language. The task is quite demanding on their English language resources, as they need to explain the process in their own words. The task really encourages students to use their resources creatively to get the message across.

The task may not be suitable for students in Prep or Year 1. Older students can be given a more complicated card game to play if Go fish is considered to be too simple. The teacher interaction should be confined to asking clarifying questions. The teacher can deliberately make errors, to see how the students are able to give further explanation and how they handle the interpersonal aspects of the task. This task is related to the TEAL Writing Task 4 How to make an origami dog and TEAL Oral task 4: how to make an origami dog. Other TEAL assessment tasks that involve procedural texts are TEAL Oral task 4: Origami dog (spoken instructions) and TEAL Writing task 13: Making a Pizza; Text Reconstruction (recipe).

Contextual information

The students had played the game several days before the videos were taken, and were taught the names of the cards.

Commentary

The students all understand the game and the nature of the task – to instruct the teacher. The context of the task, where students are explaining in real time means that they actually need to use little specific vocabulary beyond simple nouns and verbs. The challenge for the students is to clearly and logically explain the process of playing the game, and to explain how the rules work.

While there is not a great range of proficiency in the samples, in the early Stages students tend to become more confused in their explanations, and are more successful if they are able to explain as they play. In the later samples students are more able to explain key elements of the process in advance, and are less reliant on showing how the game is played.


Sample 1

Biographical information

Student A (Left of screen)

Year level: 3

First language: Assyrian

Commentary 

Both students explain the initial rules of the game, focussing on the need to look for pairs, and to use conventional polite language. They share the task of explaining but do not really cooperate, at times talking over each other rather than negotiating turns. They are both able to use quite complex structures to explain how to play, particularly as the game progresses. Only Student A provides enough language samples for an assessment.

Student A

Student A explains the basic aim of the game, using the conditional ‘if’, If you have two pairs of … a king or whatever, you put them down on the table.

She uses time adverbs in her explanation, First you have to look for two pairs, then you put it down on the table. At times her explanation becomes quite complicated, but she is able to repair or recast when she makes an error, Both of us … both of you, or when her explanation becomes confused, … now you have to ask both of us um, if you got one of … one that … like if you have three you ask one of us if we have three. … She focusses on the need to use conventional and polite phrases, You have to say ‘No, go fish’ now … and you have to say ‘Here you go’.

She speaks slowly but clearly, and the teacher gives her plenty of thinking time, and time to repair when necessary.

The marked criteria sheet shows that the student meets most of criteria at level 2 of performance.

The student’s language use in this task is consistent with the descriptions of students at Stage B1, EAL AusVELS, and the EAL Developmental Continuum.

TEAL Oral task 7 – Criteria sheet – Sample 1 – Student A


Sample 2

Biographical information

Student A (Left of screen)

Year level: 3

First language: Tagalog

Student B (Right of screen)

Year level: 3

First language: Dinka

Commentary

The students communicate quite interactively, and although they do talk over each other at times, they also cooperate in the explanation, taking over when the other seems stuck, or finishing each other’s sentences. They have a couple of disagreements about the rules but are able to resolve them.

Student A

Student A is able to manage the task, but at a somewhat earlier level than Student B. He takes part competently in the conversation, instructing and explaining as necessary, No take it this one, Yeah you can ask anyone, You have to give it, You know that like if someone lose everything, card they have that means they win 

He misses some prepositions and mixes up some conjunctions, Firstly you give seven cards each of your … friends, Firstly if you have two seven put it at the table and ask someone ip … ip you have like … you have a three … 

His pronunciation shows some errors, Gib for give, pish for fish, ip for if

The marked criteria sheet shows that the student meets some criteria at level 2 and some of criteria at level 3 of performance.

The student’s language use in this task is consistent with the descriptions of students at Stage B2, EAL AusVELS, and the EAL Developmental Continuum.

TEAL Oral task 7 – Criteria sheet – Sample 2 – Student A

Student B

Student B is able to explain the rules quite comprehensively and fluently, and can instruct the teacher when necessary: Then you look at your cards and ask you’re you’re … friend for … for… what you have, You have to make … ahh … more pairs than the person you’re playing, You have to ask the person what you have, You ask the person that’s next, Turn them around, You still ask someone if you have a joker. 

He can explain the meaning of pairs when asked, moving beyond a simplistic definition such as ‘the same card’ – Pairs is like a match, like for a jack and a jack. He uses the word shot instead of ‘turn’, My shot because I got your queen.

The student’s pronunciation is clear, and the rhythm and intonation close to a first language speaker.

This task may not be challenging enough for the student to show the full extent of his English language abilities.

The marked criteria sheet shows that the student meets most criteria at level 3 of performance.

The student’s language use in this task is consistent with the descriptions of students at Stage B2, EAL AusVELS, and the EAL Developmental Continuum.

TEAL Oral task 7 – Criteria sheet – Sample 2 – Student B


Sample 3

Biographical information

Student A (Left of screen)

Age: 14 years 7 months

First language: Chinese

Commentary

The two students do not really cooperate in instructing the teacher on how to play the game, they tend to talk across each other but do take over when the other student gets stuck. On this task Student B does not say enough for an assessment.

Student A

Student A is keen to instruct the teacher, and starts of well with an explanation of how to deal the cards – First we give seven card to each other … like this. She is able to give further details of how the game is played, when questioned by the teacher – Find the pair pair of card, Just find two same letters. 

She attempts a lengthy explanation of how points are scored but it becomes a bit confusing – If the first time I give it the card you have … ahh … two pairs or three pairs then have one point … if play the games in the games you got the new pairs you got one … if you got 2 pairs the four cards the same you can got two points.

She doesn’t use many time markers, except first, First find the same cards, You first ask us. Later on in the video she uses the word ‘continue’ after her partner uses it … and I continue. 

She tends to leave out definite and indefinite articles, If you have pair show us, No this … this is king. At other times ‘the’ is used incorrectly – The colour of the black and white.

However when using well known incidental sentences and phrases, she is often quite correct – You get one point, One point for me, You can’t ask this question. 

The marked criteria sheet shows that the student meets some criteria at level 2 and most criteria at level 3 of performance.

The student’s language use in this task is consistent with the descriptions of students at Stage S2, EAL AusVELS, and the EAL Developmental Continuum.

TEAL Oral task 7 – Criteria sheet – Sample 3 – Student A


Sample 4

Biographical information

Student A (Left of screen)

Age: 14 years and 5 months

First language: Persian and Dari

Student B (Right of screen)

Age: 14 years 4 months

First language: Burmese

Commentary

The students are sure about the rules and explain them more clearly and fluently than those in Sample 3. They use fewer polite conventional phrases and formulas, but are more varied in what they say. They understand the teacher’s comments and questions, responding very quickly to what she says – … I put it down or not? (both students simultaneously) No!; I take one? (both students simultaneously)Yeah

Student A

Student A explains the game in quite long and fluent turns – No it’s only for two people but you can really play, Don’t (show?) your numbers to anyone, If you have two number the same or two cards the same … two pairs you can take them out, Then we’ll ask if you have any number for example three. If you have number three then you have to give that to me if you don’t have you can say go fish’. She uses the word continue in her instructions, Continue asking

The marked criteria sheet shows that the student meets most criteria at level 4 of performance.

The student’s language use in this task is consistent with the descriptions of students at Stage S2, EAL AusVELS, and the EAL Developmental Continuum.

TEAL Oral task 7 – Criteria sheet – Sample 4 – Student A

Student B

Student B has fewer long turns, but is fully engaged in the task, and listens carefully to what her partner and the teacher say.

At one point, when explaining, she says – Same number and same ‘thing’. When the teacher is confused she finds it difficult to elaborate, showing her cards to the teacher to help her explain.

Her instructions are clear – First you ask me … your number and if I have I will give you.

She makes incidental statements as the game progresses, Just leave it, And you have one point, Give me … I have two points.

She uses if to signal a hypothetical situation – If I have Joker I have 5 points so now I have seven point. She mispronounces Joker as ‘shoker’ and is corrected by student A.

The marked criteria sheet shows that the student meets most criteria at level 3 of performance.

The student’s language use in this task is consistent with the descriptions of students at Stage S2, EAL AusVELS, and the EAL Developmental Continuum.

TEAL Oral task 7 – Criteria sheet – Sample 4 – Student B


Sample 5

Biographical information

Student A (Left of screen)

Age: 14 years and 1 month

First language: Cambodian

Commentary

Student A

Only Student A provides enough language samples for an assessment.

Student A is very eager to explain the game, commencing with – We go like this (shuffle) … We take seven cards for each person.

When the teacher asks to play too she is able to explain how the game can work with three people – Then maybe like we can like she ask me then I can ask her … we can go around like that

She attempts to explain the rules before they commence playing, using quite long and comprehensible turns, but not always clearly — If like have pair like, like pair …then we can put it down. And if I have pair, and she doesn’t have, um I go first, because have like … or you can rock-paper-scissors. If she doesn’t have like she say go fish.

She often uses ‘like’ as a filler. She understands the teacher’s questions and provides comprehensible answers, sometimes ‘talking herself’ into a clearer explanation – T: Can it be the same colour or the same number? S: … it can be … it only the same number. 

She and the teacher engage in a relaxed conversational manner, exchanging short phrases as they sort out the rules and instructions. She makes sure the teacher can see her cards as she plays, continuing her detailed explanation of the rules and the scoring system.

The marked criteria sheet shows that the student meets most criteria at level 4 of performance.

The student’s language use in this task is consistent with the descriptions of students at Stage S2, EAL AusVELS, and the EAL Developmental Continuum.

TEAL Oral task 7 – Criteria sheet – Sample 5 – Student A


Using this assessment to improve learning

The task provides an opportunity for students to write a procedural text. They can write up a procedure for playing the game, or write the rules of the game on a chart. Students at earlier Stages can be given sentence starters to assist them.

After writing the procedure students can then teach the game to other students using their text to see if they have written down all they need to say.

Older and more proficient students can view their videos of explaining the game to the teacher and discuss how they could have made the rules and explanation clearer.

Students can explain to another student how to play a different game, such as one they learned at school in their home country.

 


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